I study composing as a mobile, dynamic process that is constantly adapted by users in localized contexts (Fraiberg, 2010; Sun, 2012). More specifically, I’m interested in the ways people navigate and adapt communication among languages, platforms, tools, communities, and web spaces simultaneously. My goal through this work is not to “assist” individuals as they make linguistic transitions, but rather to help researchers pay attention to the writing practices of multilinguals in order to learn from them. To do this, I employ a variety of methods and methodologies to study multilingual digital writing and design. 

My work is published in Technical Communication Quarterly, College Composition and Communication, the Journal of Usability Studies, and Technical Communication, among other journals and edited collections. As part of this work, I've been awarded the Sweetland Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Prize, the inaugural 2012 Hawisher and Selfe Caring for the Future Award, the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication Diversity Scholarship, and the Scholars for the Dream Award funded by the Conference on College Composition and Communication. These awards are reflections of my commitment to ethical and rigorous scholarship, practical pedagogies, and collaboration. 

Sites of Translation: What Multilinguals can Teach us about Digital Writing and Rhetoric  

Forthcoming by The University of Michigan Press, Sites of Translation illustrates the intricate rhetorical work that multilingual communicators engage in as they translate information for their communities. Blending ethnographic and empirical methods from multiple disciplines, this book provides methodological examples of how linguistic diversity can be studied in practice, both in and outside the classroom. Sites of Translation is relevant to researchers and teachers of writing as well as technology designers interested in creating systems, pedagogies, and platforms that will be more accessible and useful to multilingual audiences.